Interview with Mani Alvand  (first published on siasatrooz.ir January 2015)

Luke Eastwood in conversation with Mani Alvand of siasatrooz.ir

Mani - What do you think about new Russian military doctrine in which it has introduced NATO as its main enemy? What do you generally think about the US-Russia tensions and Ukraine's effect on this tension? What will Russia do if Ukraine joins NATO? How will China react to these tensions?

Luke - I can't really blame Russia for this decision. After the efforts made by Reagan to end the cold war, the USA has continually back-peddled on its commitments and has done its utmost to isolate Russia and other BRICS countries. All BRICS countries are right to be suspicious of USA and its puppet NATO, a uni-polar world is their main priority and I believe that the fools in Washington are prepared to go to crazy lengths to preserve USA hegemony.

It is obvious to anyone who is not brainwashed that the USA government has managed to destroy an historic friendship between Russia and Ukraine as part of its efforts to undermine Russia. Already Ukraine is suffering greatly but I don't believe that NATO or the USA government care about sacrificing Ukraine's people so long as their long-term goals are achieved. It's unlikely that Ukraine will join NATO any time soon and I doubt the current government will last too long as the entire country (not just the East) is suffering and will suffer far more in the year ahead.

China was destroyed by foreign powers over 150 years ago and I am sure the lessons of that era have not been lost on them. China is surely keeping a close eye on Western powers, USA in particular and will definitely have plans in place to adapt to whatever new situations arise. As many observers have suggested, increased pressure and aggression from USA might actually hasten the withdrawal of China and its friends from the petro-dollar and thereby precipitate a USA/EU/Saudi economic collapse.

Mani - How do you see the blacks protests in the US? I mean, how much is this race enemity serious between blacks and whites in America and what outcomes can it have? Has the US government and Police force act logically during these protests? WHat do you think about racist culture in America?

Luke - America has a long history of exploiting African Americans as well as other ethnic groups such as the Chinese, Irish, Polish, Native Americans and Mexicans. It's arguable that Africans and their descendants suffered the most in American society and it's no wonder that tensions still exist. After all, it was only some 50 years ago that black people achieved the beginnings of equal rights. In 1990 I visited Martin Luther King's grave in Atlanta, racial separation was very much in evidence still in the South and I was shocked that I was one of barely a handful of white people present when I went to the visitor centre and museum.

Personally, from the news reports I've read, it appears to me that USA is becoming a draconian state that uses the strong arm of the police force far too much. Obviously law and order must be maintained, but it appears that ethnic minorities are not given the same benefit of the doubt that is afforded to most white people. 

If race issues are not dealt with effectively then distrust of the police is likely to inflame an already explosive situation. If any group of people feels lacking in hope and a viable future then violence and insurrection is increasingly likely, which can only make the situation worse until realistic attempts are made to address people's legitimate grievances.

Mani - How do you see the future of Iraq, since it's been said that ISIL has undegone heavy losses in tha folowing days? According to your idea, is their any hope for an end to this ISIL brutal actions in Iraq, and how do you see the role of Iraq neighbors in causing and/or solving this problem?

Luke - Writers such as Prof Michel Chussodovsky have suggested that the fragmentation of Iraq into smaller states is part of USA geo-political long-term strategy. Given what has happened in Iraq, over the last year or so, it makes such a viewpoint seem far more plausible. During the invasion of Iraq to depose Sadam Hussain the USA forces were able to destroy a much larger national army with relative ease but now they seem to be struggling with a few tens of thousands of non-professional militants. Clearly ISIL has some well-armed and well-trained fighters but I doubt that the bulk of their 'army' is comprised of experienced soldiers. The fact that ISIL is still functioning fairly unimpeded is more indicative of the laissez-faire attitude of the controllers in Washington than of ISIL's military skill.

I do not think that it is expedient for the American government to destroy ISIL - if it is not expedient then it will not happen. USA has rejected countless cries for help when it was not expedient for them and often their 'help' has involved a closet invasion or mass appropriation of resources in exchange for 'help'. If the Iraqi government turned to other countries in the region and other friends that do not have an imperial agenda then Iraq might have a chance of eliminating the ISIL problem. I cannot see Iraq relying on USA leading to an end to this crisis, in-fact I believe that it suits US policy to allow this catastrophe to continue indefinitely.

It's very obvious that oil prices are fixed and currently they are being fixed downwards by the Saudi Arabians at the request of the American government. President Obama clearly indicated in an interview that this was expected to happen, in fact it was a deliberate act to sabotage the Russian economy, with the added benefit of hurting the Venezualan and Iranian economies. The intended consequences are already apparent but there are also effects on the USA oil industry, Britain, Norway, Nigeria and all of the OPEC countries too. Russia, with it's huge gold reserves, and with help from China will struggle on, however the USA oil production via fracking, shale and tar sands is very expensive compared to conventional drilling. The USA oil industry is likely to be completely destroyed by these political decisions if the price of oil stays low for a long period of time. Another possible consequence of this policy is a further shift by friendly nations away from American influence - after all one should help out friends, not injure them.


Mani - What are the main reasons behind the falling off of oil price (and the consequences of this decrease)?

Luke - It's very obvious that oil prices are fixed and currently they are being fixed downwards by the Saudi Arabians at the request of the American government. President Obama clearly indicated in an interview that this was expected to happen, in fact it was a deliberate act to sabotage the Russian economy, with the added benefit of hurting the Venezualan and Iranian economies. The intended consequences are already apparent but there are also effects on the USA oil industry, Britain, Norway, Nigeria and all of the OPEC countries too. Russia, with it's huge gold reserves, and with help from China will struggle on, however the USA oil production via fracking, shale and tar sands is very expensive compared to conventional drilling. The USA oil industry is likely to be completely destroyed by these political decisions if the price of oil stays low for a long period of time. Another possible consequence of this policy is a further shift by friendly nations away from American influence - after all one should help out friends, not injure them.

Mani - What is your opinion about the recent mass murders in Paris?

These Parisian assassinations are a terrible, evil crime, however I think that already they are being exploited to stir up Islamiphobia. This is the work of extremists, unfortunately every religion has some fanatics but unfortunately the actions of any Islamic fanatics are used to discredit all muslims. When Christian lunatics run amok the coverage is of a less political and less hysterical tone. This story will run and run, probably for weeks, but when US planes bombed a wedding in Afghanistan killing 47 in 2008 there was little fuss made even though the same thing had happened before in 2002, killing 30.